How To Edit Text in an Editable PDF

EditingEditablePDFs

Sometimes you open a pdf you found or purchased online that is editable.  However, you are not sure how easy that is going to be to do yourself and are hesitant to mess with it.  Since I have been creating my own editable pdfs for myself lately I thought it would be a good idea to share how to make changes to them and any others you may find online.

Your first step is to open the file in Adobe Acrobat Reader.  Although there are other pdf readers out there, they may not have all the features of Adobe that allow changes to be made.

You will see blue areas of the file.  This is the area to click on and start typing.

HighlightText

Once you have typed something, click and highlight that text.

ChangeTEXT

Now press CTRL-E for PCs.  I understand that CMD-E works for Macs, but have not tested it.

A Form Field Text Properties section will now pop up where you can make changes to highlighted areas of text.  You can change color, alignment, font, font size, make text bold, italic, and underline.

You can choose any font you have on your computer as well as typing in a font size if you want a larger size than shown.  Be aware that fonts that are too large will not fit.

If you want the text properties to continue in the next text box you will either need to choose them all again in the next box or you can save some time.  Copy and paste the text from your first box into the next one.  Now the next box has the same text properties and you can just edit it with the text you want.

Ready to color and read
Fall Editable Book with name added in

Not every editable pdf will allow you all of these changes.  It all depends upon what settings the file creator set.  For example, my editable books (such as my Fall Book shown above) have a specific font set so that it will match what is in the book, but my labels allow you to make many changes.

RainbowBundleSquareCoverThe labels shown in the example are contained in my Rainbow Decor Bundle.

Geoboards in PreK

FallGeoboardsPin3

In the summer preschool teachers have time to play with the geoboards.  We had some random free cards with ideas for students to create with the boards but I really wanted some cards that went along with some of our themes to use this year with my students.  I started out with ideas based upon some fall shapes.

I picked up my geoboards from the Green Valley Book Fair, but they have a set on Amazon (aff. link) as well.

I discovered that my daughter’s abandoned loom bands (aff. link) work great with the smaller geoboards.  I tested my patterns with both loom bands and regular rubber bands.  Sometimes the regular rubber bands are a bit large and need to be wrapped to one side of a loop to curve around.  The loom bands obviously will not stretch all the way across the board.

FallGeoboardsPin2

In my examples that I have shown in this post, the apple is made with rubber bands for the apple portion and loom bands for the leaf and stem.  I used rubber bands for the leaf and acorn.  The rake is made with all loom bands.  As you can see from the photos I place both portions of the rubber band on one side of a post to change directions for curves or points.

As with anything with small parts, I do not start using geoboards with rubber bands or loom bands until I am familiar with my students and know if any still put things in their mouths.

These fall geoboard cards can be found in my shop separately or as part of my Fall Bundle.  The bundle currently includes twelve different activities to use in your classroom.

FallGeoboardCardsSquareCover

FallBundleSquareCover

Using Question of the Day in PreK

QuestionUpdates1

Since I taught several summer camps this year I decided it was time to refresh the questions in my Question of the Day Summer Fun set.  This set has questions that are great for the beginning and end of the school year if you do not teach over the summer.  I usually use a few at the end of the year and a few at the beginning when kids are thinking of outdoor activities.

I place my questions on a long pocket chart that I purchased from Amazon; they apparently do not currently offer it through Amazon, so I linked directly to Lakeshore.  I hang it with Command Hooks (aff. link) on the back of our classroom bathroom door since that is near the entrance of the room.

The top of the lunch cubby area is where I place the students’ name cards so that they can find the card and answer the question before moving on to centers activities at the beginning of the day.  At the beginning of the year I put first names on the cards, but about halfway through the year I put last names so that they will begin to recognize those as well.

During circle time one of my students is in charge of counting the responses so that we can discuss the numbers, decide which number is larger, and discuss words like more, less, tie, and unanimous.  They get very excited when we get a unanimous response.

QuestionUpdates2

These Summer questions are also included in my Question of the Day Bundle, which has more than enough questions for the entire year.  I just have a few of my new questions to laminate for the new year and then I am set.

Summer Camp Centers in Preschool

SummerQtip

Summer camp centers during our cooking camp needed to be mostly self led.  I did get brave and put out my brand new Summer Qtip Painting because I had a feeling that several of the kids at camp would enjoy the challenge since the camp was mostly students who would be entering preschool or PreK in the fall, not moving on to kindergarten.

Other than ending up with quite a few papers that did not have an owner, this center was a great success.  One thing that definitely helped were the color coded cotton swabs that I discovered at my local Dollar Tree.  I did end up needing to clean up one set midway through camp when one camper decided that the science experiment of color mixing was very interesting.

SummerQtip2

I was pleased to see that some of the campers even decided to try tracing the words at the bottoms of the sheets.  During the year in PreK I would probably have my students use a different writing implement to do the tracing part.

SummerSensoryBin

For summer cooking camp I knew sensory bins would be a hit and keep those who were not cooking very occupied.  I also did not want something that was a challenge to clean up.  My coworker had seen suggestions online for making the funnel contraption so I knew we had this to pull out of our closets.  I chose the colorful died beans because they would be easy to see on the dark rug beneath the bin.  The scissor scoopers were already in my stash, but I would love to pick up a set like the ones on Amazon from Learning Resources (aff. link.)

SummerCenters

One sensory bin was not enough for the first week of camp, so I also set up one with a sunflower seed bird seed mix, magnets, and magnetic alphabet letters.  The magnets (aff. link) are from Learning Resources.  The magnetic alphabet set was one I had in my stash, but you can also find one here (aff. link) that I also own.

I realized that we had not pulled out the Cranium Fort set this year, so each day we started a building for the students and let them try to add to it.  The older students spent more time building and the younger ones sat in it.  This set is no longer manufactured, but you can see a link to it here (aff. link) so you know what it is in case you fall upon it at a yard sale or somewhere.

IceCreamShopIn addition to these activities and our cooking we also had out some puzzles, Potato Heads, Lego Duplos and our Ice Cream Shop Pretend Play.  These kept our full house of preschoolers very busy during our cooking camp.

Summer Cooking Camp in PreK

CookingCampPinterest

After our preschool graduation we hold several three day camps in the summer for our preschoolers.  Our first camp had a cooking theme.

We made the following recipes during the camp:

Pizza Roll Ups  This was our first day’s snack.  I chose something I knew most students would like for the first day to make it more likely that they would try the snacks on the following days.

CookingCampPinterest2

Apple Sandwiches  We used multigrain O’s cereal with these.  Students spread the peanut butter and placed the cereal on the apples.  I prepared the apple slices ahead of time.  We were fortunate enough not to have any peanut allergies during this camp so that we could try this snack.

Banana Pops  We prepped these on the second day of camp so that they could be ready for our final snack on the third day.

Green Hummus  On the final day of camp my assistant called students over to the Cuisinart to help put all the ingredients in the machine.  We served this with cut up carrots, broccoli, cucumber, and crackers.

Bread in a Bag and Butter

The butter was made by pouring a small amount of heavy whipping cream in a small container and shaking it vigorously for several minutes.  I had about five students make the bread and butter each day of the camp.  I took turns with the students shaking their containers until it turned into butter.  Once it turned into butter I drained off the liquid and sent home the butter with the loaves of bread.

While we had students rotating through our cooking activities the rest worked their way through centers I had set up.   I will share those with you next.

Bird Theme Centers in PreK and a Giveaway

BirdsandFeathers

For our centers time in PreK for a birds theme, we worked our muscles in our fingers in many ways.  I created birds from clothes pins to be Momma and Papa bird.  I tried glue dots for the feathers, but hot glue definitely works better and I repaired them with hot glue.  Students grabbed pipe cleaner worms and fed them to the baby birds, which are large pom poms with google eyes and beaks glued on them.  I found similar ideas that inspired mine here and here.

We also placed beads on the matching color feathers for more fine motor practice.  Just a warning–be sure that the beads will fit on the feathers.  Our blue feather had quite a thick quill, which made it a bit difficult to get started for some students.  We used goose feathers (aff. link) for this center.  This center idea came from ChildCareLand.

BirdsBugsPlayDough

We share some of our supplies in our preschool, so the bug play dough tools came to my class this week instead of during bug week.  My students enjoyed pressing these down into their play dough.  I also had several play dough mats, including some from  1+1+1=1 .  The bug dough tools are from Lakeshore and are called 3D dough stampers.

CuttingPatternBlocks

To prepare for our build a bird craft you saw in my last post I had a bunch of bird wings for students to cut out during the week in a few colors, including white so they could color them if they wished.

I also found several bird themed pattern block pages to put out on the table.  This site has a bunch, just be sure to always print actual size and NOT to fit so that your blocks will fit on the page.  I made that mistake a couple times in the past and could not figure out what I was doing wrong.

And now for my giveaway.  Since this is Teacher Appreciation Week, I will be doing a giveaway for a $10 gift card to Teachers Pay Teachers.  Giveaway starts at midnight Monday night/Tuesday morning.  Winner will be announced Wednesday morning so that you can use your card during the sale.  Be sure to use the code THANKYOU18 when doing purchases during the sale on Tuesday and Wednesday.  Even if you don’t win the giveaway you can get great deals, especially on bundles, which will be an extra 25% off.

The bundles I use every week in my classroom include these:

Question of the Day Bundle

Alphabet Bundle

Calendar Cards Bundle

And here is the giveaway!!!!
a Rafflecopter giveaway

Bird Arts and Crafts in PreK

FeatherPainting

For our bird theme week we managed to create three completely different art or craft projects with my PreK students.  I enjoyed how they all turned out so our hallway is filled with bird themed projects.

Our first project involved painting with feathers. (aff. link)  I gave students blue and yellow feathers that they could dip in the same color paint to paint the paper.  I also provided pipe cleaner (aff. link) bird feet to dip in orange paint.  Students could use all or just one of the choices to create their artwork.

I found the idea for the pipe cleaner bird feet on Fun-a-Day.  They used the idea for turkey tracks.

HatchingEggCraft

In more of a craft vein, we created our hatching egg birds.  Someone donated hundreds of already cut out egg shapes made of a thick textured paper.  I drew a jagged line for students to practice their cutting skills first.  They also painted a circle and triangle yellow to be the head and body of the baby bird.  This project was inspired by Young School Art.

The next day I had the students put the craft together.  They cut tissue paper to make the grass.  Some students made a fringe and others cut the tissue paper into strips.  I enjoyed how the students placed the feathers and the top of the egg to make the birds have some personality.

ShapeBirds

Since we had a center to create insects and bugs recently, we took the idea to adapt for birds.  I could tell that my students were thinking much more about how to create their bird after having the practice with bugs recently.

The wings for this project came from a center we had during the week for cutting practice.  Several students enjoy cutting so there were plenty of wings to use for this project.

Coming up next I will share some of the centers we explored during our bird theme week.

Since it is Teacher Appreciation Week, there will be a sale on Teachers Pay Teachers on May 8 and 9, 2018.  My store will be 25% off with the code THANKYOU18.  You can head over to my shop and find some goodies.  Now is a good time to purchase some bundles for the fall or to use as review at the end of the year.  Below are a few bundles I use all year long in my classroom that will be awesome deals during the sale.

Question of the Day Bundle

Alphabet Bundle

Calendar Cards Bundle

 

 

Even More Bugs, Insects, and Spider Activities for PreK

BuildABug

One very popular center during Bugs, Spiders, and Insects week was the Build a Bug Center.  I gathered a bunch of shapes on a tray, along with glue sticks.  I had construction paper available for students to create a bug.  I also made scissors available in case a student wanted to cut any of the shapes before gluing.  One student created four different bug art pieces at this center during the week.  I quickly filled up my bulletin board.  You can see the first batch below.  The last set (which somehow escaped my camera) looked increasingly like specific insects as we discussed more about them as we went through the week.

BuildABugResults

This bug building center was inspired by What We Can Do With Paper And Glue.

BugObservation

In our science center we continued to observe our caterpillars as they each turned into a chrysalis.  We also did some observation of these insects from a Lakeshore set called Real Bugs Discovery Kit. (aff. link)  Some students also completed the Bug Observation Form that I printed from Sparklebox.  Several kids asked me if those were real bugs.

CaterpillarCraft

We created a several day craft to walk through the steps a caterpillar takes to become a butterfly.  You can see our caterpillars above.  I gave the students each a clothespin and a bin full of pom poms along with liquid glue.  They chose the colors they wanted and glued the pom poms on the clothespins.  I helped put the eyes on this time.

The next day we wrapped yarn around a cardboard tube to create the chrysalis.  We put the caterpillar in the chrysalis and then used markers to color a coffee filter, which we then sprayed with water.  Finally, when dry, we had the caterpillar grab its wings and emerge from its chrysalis.  They are currently hanging all around the room with the butterflies clipped to their chrysalis as if they just emerged.

LadybugRhyming

We played a small group rhyming game with a ladybug theme during our bug week.  I placed half the ladybugs in the grass, which is a drying rack for baby items that I picked up as a special buy at Aldi.  I found a very similar one on Amazon. (aff. link)  My students each received a few ladybugs and then took turns choosing a ladybug from the grass.  They then all looked at their ladybugs to figure out which person had the ladybug that rhymed to make a match.  You can find these ladybug rhyming cards on TPT.

BeehiveDramaticPlay

Our dramatic play for our insect them was BeeKeeping.  I utilized some pieces that one of my coworkers had put together last year along with some printables from this Honey Bees Dramatic Play set.  I always want labels for everything in my dramatic play because it helps with literacy development as well as clean up.   The beehive above is a file box. (aff. link)

InsideBeehive

Inside the beehive there are hanging file folders that are covered with artwork of beehives and some with painted bubble wrap.  The artwork helps the students fill out the checklist that is also part of this set, so students need to look carefully at each part of the hive to check for danger.

BeehiveInspection

I laminate my inspection sheet and have a dry erase marker and eraser available at the center for students to complete.

Beekeeper

To be a beekeeper we needed gloves, a hat with netting, a smoker, and some tools to gather the honey.  Next year I will probably add some kind of white shirt to be the beekeeper’s clothing.

BeeGarden

You cannot have bees without some flowers for them to gather nectar from, so I pulled out this set for students to water.  They also had fun taking them apart and putting them back together in various ways.  This set was found at Toysrus and was called the Mix and Match Flower Garden.  A similar set that does not have the base can be found here. (aff. link)  I actually have it as well as use it during our gardening unit.

BeeBook

For checking out more about bees in our pretend play area, I have this book.  It is called Honeybees, An Amazing Insect Discovery Book.  This book has some great photos for students to look at while in the pretend play area.

 

Bugs, Insects, and Spiders in PreK

InsectQuestion

We started our Bugs, Insects, and Spiders week with a question of the day that would go along with our dramatic play area.  I love the photo of the kids in the beekeeping suits in this question.  This question is part of my Spring Question of the Day set.

InsectPatternBlocks

Pattern blocks are inviting when on the easel with sticky paper.  The pattern blocks are made of foam.  I used painters tape to put up clear contact paper over the insect theme pattern blocks that I printed out from PreKinders.  You can find pattern blocks from Teacher Created Resources. (aff. link)  We often use Contact brand liner (aff. link) for these projects, but have also used Duck brand (aff. link) as well.  Since this side of my easel does not have a tray, I use a large clip to hold a container for the foam pattern blocks.

ABCMagnet

The other side of the easel has some alphabet review for my students.  The Alphabet Beginning Sounds Match is from my shop.  I like having a handful of letters for my students to review, instead of the entire alphabet.

ABCMagnets2

I used both capital and lowercase alphabet magnets for this center.  This set of alphabet magnets can be found here. (aff. link)  I am liking this set of alphabet magnets, although the lowercase t does have the curve at the bottom.

InsectLacing

During our Bug, Insect, and Spider week we did a couple sewing projects.  This center got a bunch more use out of it after we created a spider web with a paper plate as one of our craft projects.  I had a difficult time finding a source for these.  I would not suggest buying them at this price, but wanted to share more branding information in case you could find them somewhere else.

Cootie

How can you  have Bug, Insect, and Spider week without Cootie? (aff. link)  My set has one missing leg, but none of the kids seemed to notice this year.  Putting the legs on is probably the biggest challenge for preschoolers since the legs look like they should go on one way, but really go in on more of an angle.

InsectMeasurement

We used some linking cubes to measure some insects this week, thanks to this great freebie.  Most of my students did not bother with filling out the form, but a few tried it.  They did enjoy measuring how big each insect was.  You could use a variety of non-standard measuring tools for these critters; we used linking cubes similar to these. (aff. link)

InsectSensory

My sensory bin was filled with shell, rotini, and bow tie pasta to represent the stages of a butterfly.  I also picked up some bug catchers, small nets, and tweezers from Dollar Tree.  The nets try to slide off the plastic handle, so I will probably glue the plastic handle shut for next year.  I also have some plastic bugs from Melissa & Doug to catch.  They look similar to these (aff. link), which may be the updated version since I have had these for several years.  Some friends captured bugs while others used the bug catchers to sort pasta.

My next post will share some more of my buggy week with a look at our bee keeper dramatic play that I was fortunate to have a bunch of help creating from both a coworker and a great set online that I purchased.

Pond Life in PreK

QuestionoftheDay

We start each day with our Question of the Day, so Pond Life week started with questions about turtles, frogs, and dragonflies from my Animals set.  I like having questions with photos, especially for students who may not have seen any of these creatures in real life.

FeedTheFrog

On our fine motor and math table we played Feed the Frog with black pom pom flies.  I found the trash can at the local Dollar Tree, but they do not currently have them in stock.  I have seen other versions that use a parmesan container as well.  I would like to get some plastic flies (aff. link) to go with this game.  I had students roll the die to see how many flies to feed the frog with the tool.

PathGame

I made a spinner for this path game so there would not be competing dice on the same table.  Students move their frog along the lily pad path to the finish.  These frogs (aff. link) look like the set I have used in several places in my classroom, including this game.  I also used the frogs in my sensory bin with water and pony bead and pipe cleaner tadpoles with green foam lily pads.

turtlelettersound

I used these ABC Turtles from maketaketeach, along with letter tiles for some work on letter sounds.  This is a center that mostly required some assistance from myself or my assistant to at least get them started with the activity since many know their letters, but are still working on letter sounds.

WordBuilding

For the Pond word building students had to be able to match up lowercase and capital letters.  You can find the cards for this at A Teaching Mommy, along with several other printables for this theme.  I try to have my students sometimes match lowercase to lowercase and sometimes capital to lowercase or lowercase to capital letters when we use the letter tiles.

writingcenter

My writing center had a die with letters on it to practice writing on this sheet from PreKinders.  However, a couple girls ended up doing the heart grid above during their time at this center.  I promised to take a photo of it for one of the girls.

ScienceCenter

We are watching our caterpillars grow, so they are on the science table, along with frog life cycle stamps, some Pond Life words and some magnifying lenses.  Pond Life words were found at Sparklebox.  This is a UK website, so be sure to check wording and spelling for printables there.

PondPuzzles

I put out our Pond Life puzzles for my students to work on the large rug.  These are challenging puzzles, with no picture underneath, so are good for this time of the year.  The puzzles are say Excellerations by Discount School Supply on them, but I cannot find them anywhere online to share a link.

Calendar

I could have used my frog themed calendar this month as well, but chose to use the insects set instead since I really like all these cute insects in this set.  We are also growing our caterpillars into butterflies as well as doing an insect theme this month.  If you really have a hard time deciding which calendar numbers to use each month, please check out my bundle.

During story time we used several pond animal themed books.  There are affiliate links to them below so that you can get a closer look at them by clicking on the book covers.

This version of Five Little Ducks is a board book with cut outs.  I usually use this one during farm week and read the next one during ponds week.

The illustrations by Ivan Bates in this version of Five Little Ducks are really cute.  I like how each duckling has something to give its mother when they return.

Jump! is one of those chain stories.  Each animal jumps because of a larger animal.  The version I have also has Spanish in it.

Frog and Toad stories are fun to share at this time of year because students are better at longer stories.  They also enjoy hearing stories that involve characters they know.

It’s Mine! by Leo Lionni is all about some frogs that are selfish and how they learn not to be.  I channel my inner three year old to read the lines of the selfish frogs.

This one has some great photos of frogs without filling the page with too many words for a preschooler to handle.